Living with EoE

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic and progressive condition in which immune cells (eosinophils) build up within the esophagus. This buildup is associated with an abnormal response of the immune system, known as Type 2 inflammation. Over time, this can cause damage to the esophagus.

How Inflammation Affects the Esophagus

Normal esophagus
Eosinophil buildup
causes inflammation
Inflammation leads to
difficulty
swallowing
and other symptoms
of EoE
EoE is a chronic and progressive disease

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS of EoE?

Physical SYMPTOMS

  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Food getting stuck in the esophagus (impaction)
  • Choking
  • Vomiting
  • Chest pain/heartburn even after taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)

Symptoms can show up differently
in children (ages 1-11 years) and include:

  • Stomach pain
  • Regurgitation
  • Vomiting
  • Food refusal

COPING CLUES

  • Cutting food into small bites (the size a toddler could eat)
  • Avoiding certain foods
  • Avoiding social occasions that center around eating
  • Blending food
  • Adding sauces or dips to food
  • Eating slowly, chewing excessively
  • Drinking water with food

EoE can be misdiagnosed as food allergies or GERD
(gastroesophageal reflux disease).

EoE PATIENT PROFILES

We know living with EoE can be complex and sometimes feel overwhelming. Here are a few profiles
of patients who may be
facing similar challenges from EoE and use DUPIXENT
for treatment. These are not actual patients.


Susan, 27

PERSISTENT FLARE-UPS DESPITE
MANAGING HER EoE WITH PPIs

Preschool Teacher

Baker, home-based caterer

Susan loves nothing more than creating elaborate meals and hosting great dinner parties for coworkers. Unfortunately, her EoE flare-ups have made it difficult to enjoy these activities, despite managing her EoE with PPIs. Susan feels as though her difficulty swallowing has gotten worse and could reach the point of food getting stuck.


How Susan copes

Takes small
bites
Eats slowly and
chews food well

Background and Symptoms

  • Diagnosed with EoE at 21 years old
  • First flare-up occurred at 10 years old
  • Struggles with swallowing food,
    heartburn, and chest pain
  • Avoids eggs and wheat

Treatment Goal

  • Hopes to eat food with less difficulty
    swallowing

Learn how to start the conversation
to see if DUPIXENT is right for you.
Explore discussion guide
Mark, 34

STRUGGLES WITH A
RESTRICTED DIET

Financial Manager

Bowler, sports lover

Mark spends most of his spare time bowling and is a member of an amateur bowling league, where many of his buddies play and socialize. Sadly, a restricted diet due to his EoE symptoms and multiple food allergies makes socializing a challenge when food is around.


How Mark copes

Drinks excessive fluids
to get food down
Covers food
in sauces

Background and Symptoms

  • Diagnosed with EoE at 25 years old
  • Experienced symptoms at 15 years old
  • Trouble with swallowing and food
    getting stuck
  • Avoids dairy, soy, eggs, and nuts
  • Previously had esophageal dilation

Treatment Goal

  • To swallow food more easily

Learn how to discuss your treatment
goals with your doctor.
Explore discussion guide
Jack, 15

SEEKING AN OPTION
OTHER THAN
PPIs,
STEROIDS, AND
DIETS

Student

Gamer, YouTuber

One challenge in Jack’s life is that he’s now living with EoE and is on a diet to avoid foods that could trigger his flare-ups. Jack's EoE symptoms make it tough for him to eat around his buddies. Jack is on food trials and PPIs but still complains of trouble swallowing and stomach pains. He needs an alternative.


How Jack copes

Avoids events centered
around eating
Cuts food into
small bites

Background and Symptoms

  • Diagnosed with EoE 5 months ago
  • Experienced symptoms 2 years ago
  • Battles with swallowing food, vomiting,
    and stomach pain
  • Avoids wheat and dairy

Treatment Goal

  • Enjoy foods without fear of choking

Find out how to talk about your
symptoms with your doctor.
Explore discussion guide

Who Can Treat EoE?

EoE REQUIRES THE HELP OF SPECIALISTS
WHO UNDERSTAND IT

If you think you or your loved one may have EoE, you
should make an appointment with a gastroenterologist
(GI), who can evaluate your symptoms and order the tests
needed to make a diagnosis.

EoE symptoms may be mistaken for other conditions.
Getting the right diagnosis is the first step toward
managing symptoms.

HOW IS EoE DIAGNOSED?

A gastroenterologist (GI) does a procedure called an
“endoscopy with biopsy” to determine whether a
person has EoE. The GI uses a thin tube to look at the
esophagus and take tissue samples. The GI may
diagnose EoE based on your symptoms, how the esophagus looks, and the number of eosinophils in the
tissue sample.

FIND A SPECIALIST WHO CAN TREAT EoE

Use this Healthgrades™ tool to easily find a nearby specialist with experience in treating patients suffering from eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

Sanofi US and Regeneron do not endorse or recommend any particular physician, and search results do not include a comprehensive list of doctors in your area.

Have a productive
Conversation With
Your Doctor

Our goal is for you or your loved one to get the most out of your visit to the doctor. Fill out our personalized discussion guide to help yourself have a productive conversation during your next visit.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The most common symptoms of EoE are: 
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Feeling of food being stuck
  • Heartburn and/or chest pain
The symptoms of EoE can often be different depending on patient age:
  • Infants and toddlers might refuse food and lose weight or develop malnutrition
  • Children could have trouble swallowing, may vomit, or have abdominal pain
  • Teens and adults may have more difficulty swallowing as the esophagus narrows, causing impaction

A variety of treatments are used to help treat EoE symptoms, including:

Biologics

Biologics are specialty medicines that are processed in the body differently than oral medicines or topical medicines. In order to be effective, and to work properly, most biologics are injectable medications. They target specific proteins that contribute to the disease and can help reduce EoE symptoms.

Proton Pump Inhibitors

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a class of medications that reduce stomach acid production. While commonly used for EoE symptoms, PPIs are not an FDA approved treatment for EoE.

Swallowed Topical Steroids

In EoE, topical steroids are swallowed to act directly on the esophagus to help dampen inflammation.

Esophageal Dilation

This procedure occurs during an endoscopy and opens the esophagus by stretching it out.

Researchers are not certain about the exact cause of EoE. However, foods such as dairy, wheat, egg, soy, nuts, and seafood are recognized as the most common triggers for EoE.