CARING FOR A LOVED ONE
LIVING WITH ECZEMA?

We know how important it is to be there for the people you care for, and we want to
support you every step of the way. That's why we put together these resources for
caregivers to patients of all age groups with moderate-to-severe eczema. Be sure
to check back here often for updates.

Resources by age group

Managing eczema presents a unique set of challenges to every caregiver. Choose a patient age group below to
explore information and resources tailored toward helping you on the various stages of your caregiving journey.

YOUNG CHILDREN

(6 months-5 years)

Young ones may not understand their disease or how hard you work to manage
their symptoms. The resources below might be able to help.

Injection Tips & Tricks For CAREGIVERS

When it’s time to inject, consider these tips and
tricks from real caregivers:

  • Children feed off your emotional state, so if you’re calm and encouraging, the process can be less stressful
  • Be fully prepared ahead of time and create a routine you can follow every injection
  • Telling stories, singing songs, or saying silly rhymes are great ways to keep children preoccupied during the injection

For more tips and tricks from real caregivers,
download the Child Injection Activity Guide today.

Do not try to inject DUPIXENT until you have been
trained by your healthcare provider.

Simple Ways to Offer Comfort

Many parents find it helpful to use distraction techniques
when giving injections to a young child. Here are a few
methods you may find useful at injection time:

Infants (6-12 Months)

Sing a song

Read pop-up books

Toddlers (1-3 Years)

Listen to music

Build with blocks

Preschoolers (3-5 years)

Listen to music

Tell a story

Sign up for more tips like these and and other resources for caregivers of young children with DUPIXENT MyWay®.

Caregivers Share Their STORIES

Managing eczema in young children can be challenging. Hear one mom’s experience with
DUPIXENT, plus tips from real caregivers for making the process a smoother one.

CHILDREN

(6-11 years)

As kids grow, they may develop a better sense of how eczema affects them and the steps necessary to
manage their symptoms. Check out the tips and resources below to help establish a routine that works
for you and your loved one.

Injection Tips & Tricks For CAREGIVERS

When it’s time to inject, consider these tips and tricks from real caregivers:

  • Write the injection day on a calendar so your child knows
    when it’s coming and has time to mentally prepare.
  • When possible, allow your child some choice—whether it’s
    choosing a spot to sit, a song to listen to, or the time of day to
    receive the injection.
  • Sometimes providing a reward works well—but often, a little
    quality one-on-one time is incentive enough.

Do not try to inject DUPIXENT until you have been trained by your healthcare provider.

CAREGIVERS SHARE THEIR STORIES

As a caregiver, you’re never alone. Find inspiration from DUPIXENT MyWay® Caregiver
Ambassadors, and hear tips for making the injection process more manageable.

TEENS

(12-17 years)

When kids grow into teenagers, they’re faced with a new set of challenges and experiences—especially when
they’re also dealing with eczema. Use the resources below to help guide your teen on their eczema journey.

“Communication and collaboration are key to figuring out what works for you and your child.”

—Cortney DiRussa, M.A. Behavioral Science Expert

Preparing for a Life of Independence

As teens mature, some may take a more active role in managing their condition.
Here are a few pieces of advice from caregivers Yetunde and Sue, as well as
behavioral science expert Cortney DiRussa:

Encourage your teen to keep a journal of flare-ups and
symptoms so they can discuss any changes with their doctor.

Encourage your teen to take an active role in their care
and ask questions during appointments.

Create a care plan for when your teen is away from home,
including injection reminders, receiving and storing DUPIXENT
shipments, and administering injections.

Explore additional resources such as on-campus student health centers, telehealth appointments, or supplemental injection support from a DUPIXENT MyWay® Nurse Educator.

Help empower your teen to take charge of their eczema care with our Tip Sheet below.

DOWNLOAD TIPS FOR TEENS  

CAREGIVERS SHARE THEIR STORIES

View the videos below for advice and inspiration on guiding your teen through the
treatment process and adapting to your evolving role as a caregiver.

Young adults

(18+ years)

Independently managing eczema for the first time can feel daunting. Listen to two young adults as they
transition to taking over their own care with some practical tips and advice.

Transition of care

Watch Adante and Cristal, two young adults living with
eczema, discuss taking ownership of caring for their skin.

VO:
Sponsored by Regeneron and Sanofi.

CORTNEY:
Hi, I’m Cortney DiRussa, a behavioral scientist here with a question for you: What does taking DUPIXENT® (dupilumab) look like when you’re living on your own for the first time?

This “transition of care” can be a big step, and there’s a lot to consider. You may need to find a new healthcare provider or create a plan to continue seeing your current provider.

You will need to navigate insurance, manage your treatment, and learn to advocate for yourself. But you know what? DUPIXENT patients are doing just that every day.

You’re going to hear from some real patients about how they have taken the lead in their own care in just a moment.

First, please listen to some important information about DUPIXENT.

DUPIXENT is a prescription medicine used to treat adults and children 6 months of age and older with moderate-to-severe eczema that is not well controlled with prescription therapies used on the skin, or who cannot use topical therapies.

You should not use DUPIXENT if you are allergic to dupilumab or to any of the ingredients in DUPIXENT.

Please be sure to read and listen to the full Important Safety Information at the end of this video—and access the full Prescribing Information including Patient Information using the links within the description.

Now, let’s hear from Cristal and Adante, two working adults in their 20s who take DUPIXENT for their moderate-to-severe eczema.

CORTNEY:
Cristal, I’d love for you to tell us how you became fully responsible for your own care.

CRISTAL:
Well, I’ve had eczema since I was a baby. Growing up, my parents were really active in caring for my eczema. But as I entered my teen years, they let me “own it” more. Also, as a teenager, I started taking a more active role in managing my own prescription topical creams and ointments. I understood my skin more and began leading the conversations with my doctor.

CORTNEY:
Adante, when did you start taking a more active role in your eczema care?

ADANTE:
I’ve had eczema for as long as I can remember. My mom was a registered nurse, so she always helped me care for my skin growing up. I’d say I started taking more responsibility of my eczema when I was in high school. I started doing my own research, watching videos about eczema online, and keeping track of my flare-ups.

CORTNEY:
When they were younger, Cristal and Adante had a lot of support from their parents in managing their conditions. As they grew up, they both started taking a more active role in their care, which is common. But sometimes there are unexpected challenges. Let’s see how Cristal and Adante responded in those moments.

CRISTAL:
My symptoms became worse when I was away from home at college. My usual treatments weren’t keeping my eczema under control. I asked my dermatologist for something different. And that's when we decided to start treatment with DUPIXENT.

CORTNEY:
And how big of a decision was that for you?

CRISTAL:
That was a huge decision for me. I took time to research it, and I talked it over with my parents. They said that they’d support me 100% with whatever I decided and that it was my call. Before I started DUPIXENT, I discussed with my doctor all the medical conditions I had and medications I was taking. My doctor and I talked about the potential benefits and risks of treatment, including the most common side effects such as injection site reactions… …and some serious side effects, including allergic reactions that can sometimes be severe, eye problems, and joint aches and pain.

ADANTE:
I had already started DUPIXENT by the time I moved to a new city for my first job. But I needed to find a new dermatologist in my area.

COURTNEY:
Did you ask your mom for help with that?

ADANTE:
My mom was hundreds of miles away. She wasn’t going to find someone for me. That was something I had to do. I spent a lot of time reading reviews online and trying to find someone who I felt would understand eczema on my skin tone.

CORTNEY:
How was your experience, Cristal?

CRISTAL:
It seemed a little overwhelming at first, having to make my own dermatologist appointments, learning to self-inject, and working with DUPIXENT MyWay® to get set up with a specialty pharmacy. But I tried to be patient with myself and took things step-by-step.

CORTNEY:
Good for you. It’s normal to feel overwhelmed at times when you first start taking on responsibility for your own care. How did you start feeling more comfortable with self-injecting?

CRISTAL:
After I was properly trained by my doctor, I followed his instructions on self-injection and got more comfortable with it after giving myself the injection the first couple of times.

ADANTE:
For me, there was a learning curve. I had to try to figure out a routine that worked for me. I started putting reminders in my phone for when to take my DUPIXENT out of the fridge, when to inject it, and where to inject it. Eczema is a chronic condition, and since I’m on my own now, it’s on me to make sure I don’t miss a dose.

CORTNEY:
Of course, while you’re getting comfortable with your new routine, it’s a good idea to talk with your parent or caregiver and let them know how you’re adjusting. They might be able to help you think through how your new schedule or environment may disrupt your injection routine, and how you can adapt.

CRISTAL:
I think the most important thing to do when you’re becoming more independent is to advocate for yourself. ADANTE: There are a lot of resources out there to help you figure things out. Ask a lot of questions. Be confident and just know you can do this!

CORTNEY:
That’s great advice from Adante and Cristal! Here are a couple of other things to consider as you’re making your “transition of care.”

You may want to ask your doctor to assist with the switch to a new provider by preparing a medical summary to share with them.

When speaking with a new doctor, you'll want to share your health history, let them know all the medications you may be taking, and ask questions to make sure it's a good fit.

Also, your health insurance may change as you move away from your parents’ insurance or start a new job. Make sure that your health insurance is all set up. It will be important to take the time to understand your coverage and ask your new provider if they take your insurance. Notify your pharmacy of any changes to your prescription insurance. You can always contact the DUPIXENT MyWay Support Team if you have questions.

You’ll want to find an injection routine that works for you. Remember to set reminders for yourself in your phone.

And remember, you can always find additional support and “transition of care” resources on DUPIXENT.com.

Please make sure to read and listen to the following Important Safety Information. Thanks for watching!

Important Safety Information and Indication

Do not use if you are allergic to dupilumab or to any of the ingredients in DUPIXENT®.

Before using DUPIXENT, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have eye problems.
  • have a parasitic (helminth) infection.
  • are scheduled to receive any vaccinations. You should not receive a “live vaccine” right before and during treatment with DUPIXENT.
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known whether DUPIXENT will harm your unborn baby.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known whether DUPIXENT passes into your breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Especially tell your healthcare provider if you are taking oral, topical or inhaled corticosteroid medicines or if you have atopic dermatitis and asthma and use an asthma medicine. Do not change or stop your corticosteroid medicine or other asthma medicine without talking to your healthcare provider. This may cause other symptoms that were controlled by the corticosteroid medicine or other asthma medicine to come back.

DUPIXENT can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Allergic reactions. DUPIXENT can cause allergic reactions that can sometimes be severe. Stop using DUPIXENT and tell your healthcare provider or get emergency help right away if you get any of the following signs or symptoms: breathing problems or wheezing, swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue, or throat, fainting, dizziness, feeling lightheaded, fast pulse, fever, hives, joint pain, general ill feeling, itching, skin rash, swollen lymph nodes, nausea or vomiting, or cramps in your stomach-area.
  • Eye problems. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new or worsening eye problems, including eye pain or changes in vision, such as blurred vision. Your healthcare provider may send you to an ophthalmologist for an eye exam if needed.
  • Joint aches and pain. Some people who use DUPIXENT have had trouble walking or moving due to their joint symptoms, and in some cases needed to be hospitalized. Tell your healthcare provider about any new or worsening joint symptoms. Your healthcare provider may stop DUPIXENT if you develop joint symptoms.

The most common side effects in patients with eczema include injection site reactions, eye and eyelid inflammation, including redness, swelling, and itching, sometimes with blurred vision, dry eye, cold sores in your mouth or on your lips, and high count of a certain white blood cell (eosinophilia).

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of DUPIXENT. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Use DUPIXENT exactly as prescribed by your healthcare provider. It’s an injection given under the skin (subcutaneous injection). Your healthcare provider will decide if you or your caregiver can inject DUPIXENT. Do not try to prepare and inject DUPIXENT until you or your caregiver have been trained by your healthcare provider. In children 12 years of age and older, it’s recommended DUPIXENT be administered by or under supervision of an adult. In children 6 months to less than 12 years of age, DUPIXENT should be given by a caregiver.

Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information including Patient Information.

Indication

DUPIXENT is a prescription medicine used to treat adults and children 6 months of age and older with moderate-to-severe eczema (atopic dermatitis or AD) that is not well controlled with prescription therapies used on the skin (topical), or who cannot use topical therapies. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids. It is not known if DUPIXENT is safe and effective in children with atopic dermatitis under 6 months of age.

THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN
FINDING A NEW SKIN SPECIALIST

Whether due to new a new living location or
personal preference, young adults may have reason
to find a new healthcare partner. Here are some
useful things to keep in mind:

Ask their current provider for a medical summary. Remember, your doctor is always the best source of information.

Check in with them to ensure that they feel their new provider is a good fit.

Review their insurance coverage. DUPIXENT MyWay® can help with this. Call 1-844-DUPIXENT.

Remind them that establishing a treatment routine is an important part of staying on track with treatment.

Additionally, take ownership of your eczema care with our Tip Sheet below.

Finding support

Caregiving is a journey, and every journey is made easier with a little support.
Explore the below to find helpful tips and information from other caregivers.

INTRODUCING SELF-CARE FOR THE CAREGIVER

This new podcast from DUPIXENT explores common
challenges faced by caregivers along with practical advice
from behavioral experts on how to overcome them.

LISTEN on YouTube

Want to Hear From More Caregivers?

Browse our full collection of videos on
YouTube for more real caregivers and patients
talking about their lives with DUPIXENT.

Watch on youtube

Connect With a
DUPIXENT MyWay® Mentor

Hoping to learn more? If you’ve had a discussion with your healthcare provider about DUPIXENT or have been prescribed DUPIXENT, register online today to talk one-on-one with trained Patient or Caregiver DUPIXENT Mentors to discuss life with moderate-to-severe eczema and hear about their personal journey with DUPIXENT.

Enroll online or call
1‑844‑DUPIXENT
(1-844-387-4936), option 5

MEET OUR CAREGIVERS

Caring for children with moderate-to-severe eczema is not easy. Here are the stories of a few individuals
who, like you, face challenges as caregivers of children with eczema. Their journeys led them to DUPIXENT.

JILL

Caregiver, Mom, Psychologist
St. Louis, MO

Daughter, Calla, has
uncontrolled skin rashes on
shins and elbows

Don't settle. You can get
complacent and think
you're doing okay, but
there may be options
you haven't considered.”

—Jill, Calla’s Mom

CALLA

Age 9, daughter to Jill
Living with severe eczema
Enjoys soccer and swimming


Calla’s background and symptoms:

  • Diagnosed with eczema as an infant
  • Suffers with rashes on shins and elbows
     

Treatments used:

  • Prescription ointment
  • Corticosteroid spray

Discover results with DUPIXENT in patients ages 6 to 11.

View Results in Children


YETUNDE

Caregiver, Mom, IT Specialist
Hilliard, OH

Daughter, Ore, struggles with
itchy skin on her hands, ankles,
and feet

Advocate for your child
relentlessly. That might
require research and
asking lots of questions.”

—Yetunde, Ore’s Mom

READ ORE’S STORY

ORE

Age 17, daughter to Yetunde
Living with severe eczema
Loves music and theater


Ore's background and symptoms:

  • Diagnosed with eczema at age 9
  • Struggles with itchy skin on hands, ankles, and feet

Treatments used:

  • Lotions
  • Prescription ointment

Discover results with DUPIXENT in patients ages 12 to 17.

View Results in teens


ALISA

Caregiver, Mom, Teacher
Portland, CT

Daughter, Lila, suffers from
red, bumpy patches on her
arms and legs

Trust your gut. Talking
to my doctor was a
tremendous help for me.”

—Alisa, Lila’s Mom

LILA

Age 4, daughter to Alisa
Living with severe eczema
Likes playing outdoors


Lila's background and symptoms:

  • Diagnosed with eczema at age 2
  • Skin turns red easily when touched

Treatments used:

  • Mild soaps
  • Corticosteroid cream

Discover results with DUPIXENT in patients ages 6 months to 5 years.

View Results in young children


HOW DUPIXENT WORKS

Eczema is caused, in part, by inflammation beneath the skin due to an overactive immune
system. Topical medicines alone may not be enough to control your loved one’s eczema.

Watch the video below to take a look inside
the science of what causes eczema
symptoms and how DUPIXENT may help.

A LOOK INSIDE

Please stay tuned until the end of the video for the full Important Safety Information.

Today we’re going to be learning more about uncontrolled moderate-to-severe eczema (atopic dermatitis or AD), and how DUPIXENT® (dupilumab) might be able to help.

Think about how eczema (atopic dermatitis) has impacted your skin.

You have the next possible flare-up, your ongoing symptoms, and trying to manage them.

The topical prescription lotions, creams, and steroid treatments you’ve been prescribed may not be working as well as you would like, and that can be frustrating.

Well, eczema is more than a chronic skin condition that appears on the surface of the skin. It's a disease caused in part by an overactive immune system that leads to more inflammation than normal in your body.

In people with eczema, immune cells in the deeper layers of the skin send too many inflammatory signals to the surface, causing an itchy rash.

This inflammation can cause red, dry patches that lead to ongoing symptoms, like itching and scratching.

And continuous scratching breaks down the outer layer of the skin, which allows germs, irritants, and allergens to get in.

In response to these invaders, your immune system continues to send inflammatory signals to the surface, causing even more redness and itching.

So, what if there was another way to help address a source of inflammation that can cause the itch-scratch cycle?

Let’s take a look at DUPIXENT.

Unlike topical steroids, DUPIXENT works by targeting an underlying source of inflammation deep beneath the skin to help prevent flare-ups on the surface.

DUPIXENT works beneath the skin by attaching to certain proteins on the immune cells, inhibiting—or blocking—some of the inflammatory signals that contribute to eczema.

Think of it like this: There are calls you want to receive, like calls from friends and family.

But then, there are those pesky spam calls.

If you add a spam filter to your phone that helps lower the amount of pesky calls, you can answer the calls you do want to receive.

By blocking some of these overactive signals—much like reducing the number of pesky calls you receive—DUPIXENT helps to reduce the inflammation that leads to symptoms you see and feel on the surface of your skin.

That means clearer skin and noticeably less itch. Of course, as you consider DUPIXENT, it’s good to keep in mind that if you have a parasitic (helminth) infection, you should talk to your doctor about having that treated before starting DUPIXENT.

In a 52-week clinical trial with adults taking DUPIXENT plus a topical corticosteroid (TCS) (compared to those taking a TCS only), nearly 3 times saw clear or almost clear skin (39% versus 12% not taking DUPIXENT at 16 weeks and 22% of adults taking DUPIXENT + TCS saw clear or almost clear skin at both 16 and 52 weeks vs. 7% on TCS only).

And, nearly 4 times had significant itch reduction at 1 year. (51% at 52 weeks versus 13% on TCS only). 59% saw significantly less itch versus 20% not taking DUPIXENT at 16 weeks, and 18% saw itch reduction in as fast as 2 weeks vs 8% not taking DUPIXENT.

DUPIXENT was studied in 3 clinical trials with more than 2,100 adults with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe eczema.

The most common side effects in patients with atopic dermatitis include injection site reactions, eye and eyelid inflammation, including redness, swelling, and itching, sometimes with blurred vision, cold sores in your mouth or on your lips, and high count of a certain white blood cell (eosinophilia).

Remember, eczema is a chronic condition. It’s important to take your medication exactly as your doctor prescribes.

So, get ready to get ahead of your symptoms with DUPIXENT, and roll up those sleeves—DUPIXENT helps heal your skin from within.

Important Safety Information and Indication

Do not use if you are allergic to dupilumab or to any of the ingredients in DUPIXENT®.

Before using DUPIXENT, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have eye problems.
  • have a parasitic (helminth) infection.
  • are scheduled to receive any vaccinations. You should not receive a “live vaccine” right before and during treatment with DUPIXENT.
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known whether DUPIXENT will harm your unborn baby.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known whether DUPIXENT passes into your breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Especially tell your healthcare provider if you are taking oral, topical or inhaled corticosteroid medicines or if you have atopic dermatitis and asthma and use an asthma medicine. Do not change or stop your corticosteroid medicine or other asthma medicine without talking to your healthcare provider. This may cause other symptoms that were controlled by the corticosteroid medicine or other asthma medicine to come back.

DUPIXENT can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Allergic reactions. DUPIXENT can cause allergic reactions that can sometimes be severe. Stop using DUPIXENT and tell your healthcare provider or get emergency help right away if you get any of the following signs or symptoms: breathing problems or wheezing, swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue, or throat, fainting, dizziness, feeling lightheaded, fast pulse, fever, hives, joint pain, general ill feeling, itching, skin rash, swollen lymph nodes, nausea or vomiting, or cramps in your stomach-area.
  • Eye problems. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new or worsening eye problems, including eye pain or changes in vision, such as blurred vision. Your healthcare provider may send you to an ophthalmologist for an eye exam if needed.
  • Joint aches and pain. Some people who use DUPIXENT have had trouble walking or moving due to their joint symptoms, and in some cases needed to be hospitalized. Tell your healthcare provider about any new or worsening joint symptoms. Your healthcare provider may stop DUPIXENT if you develop joint symptoms.

The most common side effects in patients with eczema include injection site reactions, eye and eyelid inflammation, including redness, swelling, and itching, sometimes with blurred vision, dry eye, cold sores in your mouth or on your lips, and high count of a certain white blood cell (eosinophilia).

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of DUPIXENT. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Use DUPIXENT exactly as prescribed by your healthcare provider. It’s an injection given under the skin (subcutaneous injection). Your healthcare provider will decide if you or your caregiver can inject DUPIXENT. Do not try to prepare and inject DUPIXENT until you or your caregiver have been trained by your healthcare provider. In children 12 years of age and older, it’s recommended DUPIXENT be administered by or under supervision of an adult. In children 6 months to less than 12 years of age, DUPIXENT should be given by a caregiver.

Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information including Patient Information.

Indication

DUPIXENT is a prescription medicine used to treat adults and children 6 months of age and older with moderate-to-severe eczema (atopic dermatitis or AD) that is not well controlled with prescription therapies used on the skin (topical), or who cannot use topical therapies. DUPIXENT can be used with or without topical corticosteroids. It is not known if DUPIXENT is safe and effective in children with atopic dermatitis under 6 months of age.

What’s a Biologic?

Your immune system is made up of cells that talk to each other. In chronic inflammatory conditions, sometimes they talk too much. Biologics work to disrupt the conversation when cells are talking too much.

  • Biologics are specialty medicines that are processed in the body
    differently than oral or topical medications.
  • To be effective and work in the body properly, most biologics are
    delivered by injection.
  • DUPIXENT is a biologic that helps block a key source of
    inflammation inside the body that can cause eczema signs and symptoms.

THE DUPIXENT MyWay  
COPAY CARD

The DUPIXENT MyWay copay card may help eligible,
commercially insured patients cover the out-of-pocket cost of
DUPIXENT. Eligible patients can enroll online and will receive
their cards by email. Terms & Restrictions Apply.

VIEW COPAY DETAILS

Sign up to get more information, including helpful tools and resources, in your inbox with DUPIXENT MyWay email updates.

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